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All the fashionable things

SUSTAINABLE SWIMWEAR THAT WE LOVE

SUSTAINABLE SWIMWEAR THAT WE LOVE

At What on Earth, we believe fashion shouldn’t come at a cost; neither to the planet, nor to anyone who makes our clothes. It was created to provide a home for all things sustainable fashion, so you can look good and feel good. Check out our guilt-free list of conscious and ethical swimwear brands.

Made for women, by women. Nael swimwear is a brand designed in Spain and born out of a love and respect for the ocean. Through using sustainable materials, such as dead stock or recycled fabrics, they use fibres that would otherwise be polluting our oceans. All of the materials used in Nael’s swimwear collections have the OEKO-TEX 100 certificates to prove that they are toxin-free. To promote inclusivity, Nael uses real women of all different shapes and sizes to showcase their vibrant swimsuits. Nael didn’t have to compromise style for ethics. Shop their “body type guide” to see what is going to look good on YOU. Believing in “feeling free in embracing how we are and loving our body” Nael also believes that “all shapes are beautiful’ and that their goal as a brand is to enhance them, because don’t we all deserve to feel comfortable and safe in our bodies?  Click here to view Nael’s collection.

 Want to know who makes your clothes? Nōage gives you the insight to the talent behind this swimwear through the “Meet the makers” part of their website, taking you on a journey from Italy to Slovenia, and to Bali. Nōage offers an honest, slow fashion alternative for minimalistic and timeless designs for their swim pieces whilst still maintaining a sustainable approach. By removing plastic fishing nets and working alongside the Global Recycling Standard, Nōage can create their swimwear whilst also being conscious of the environment. But they don’t stop there! This brand takes care of another huge issue with fast fashion: worker’s rights. They guarantee that their Indonesian workers work under the best possible conditions and receive above average pay, you can learn more from their website and follow their journey on their Instagram. Once you’ve made the right decision to buy your bikini from Nōage, it will arrive in fully recyclable packaging. These sleek and flatteringly designed swimsuits are some of Nōage’s collection. View the rest of Nōage’s collection here.
  • La Bom Swim

    If you care about women’s empowerment and sustainable fashion, then La Bom Swimwear is for you. The fabrics that the bikini sets are made from are ECONYL, regenerated nylon, which is recycled fishing nets, fabric scraps and industrial plastic, but it’s also a strong, soft material once it’s recycled back to its original purity. La Bom likes to keep it real — they don’t pay anyone to model their clothing, but use real girls and their photographs of them in La Bom’s bikinis. No photoshopped supermodels. To empower women all over the globe, La Bom has teamed up with The Cup Foundation, whose mission is to facilitate young, underprivileged girls and boys with education surrounding sexual health and menstruation. With every bikini set or one piece purchased online, a young girl is provided a sustainable menstrual cup, education and long-term support for her family, which gives her unlimited freedom each month, and keeps plastic out of the ocean. Read more about what La Bom are doing here.

  • Small Field Swim

Created by Kati Kleinfelder, a London-based Product Developer, Textile Designer and avid swimmer, Small Field Swim is a swimwear brand dedicated to sustainability and inclusivity to provide products that are organic and consciously ‘grown’. After finding out there was little available which suited D Cup breasts or bigger, they set out to create swimwear that expands up to cup size F, and manufacture both functional and supportive swimwear. They use exclusively Italian produced yarns and fabrics, and their production line is minimised to a 60 mile/95km distance, keeping their carbon footprint lower than most. Small Field Swim takes things one step at a time: focusing on a small, strong and versatile range that people actually like, and builds feedback and wearer trials. Recycled fabrics, materials, and renewable yarn are used to create their collection, and are aimed at women of all shapes and sizes. Your swimwear piece/set will arrive to your door in a Hydropol garment bag, which uses the waste product from oil production and are ocean-safe, water-soluble and biodegradable bags that break down to a biomass free of toxins in both the soil and the sea.

Inhala Soulwear was founded by two Peruvian yogis who decided to create an authentic and mindful soulwear brand. By using recycled plastic to create recycled nylon, the materials are given a new life and ultimately, waste is removed from the ocean and turned into something beautiful. Alongside recycled nylon, Inhala also uses Peruvian fair-trade organic cotton, which requires 91% less water to manufacture than regular cotton, these materials are safer to you and to the planet. Inhala consciously make every step of their production line is traced so they can ensure they maintain a positive impact on the environment. At checkout, there is a $1 plant-a-tree initiative, and your soulwear will be delivered in fully recyclable packaging. Inhala also donate unsold stock to the women’s organisations they work closely with (yet another reason why this brand is so kind). Check out more from Inhala Soulwear here.

Derived from their dream of a sustainable future, Mayomi reuse plastic waste and ensure no new materials are being used to manufacture their clothing. To be a long-term part of your wardrobe, Mayomi boast longevity in their products to resist suncreams, oils and chlorine. The brand also supports honesty and fairness, by working closely with their Balinese employees, they can guarantee safe and ethical working conditions, so you can look good in your purchase, and feel good about it too. Check out more from Mayomi Swimwear here.

 

Samantha McPhee